Afar, by Leila del Duca and Kit Seaton

In a future wasteland, a family of four contends with familiar obstacles to make ends meet, eventually leaving the teenage children to care for themselves while their parents travel to find work just as their eldest discovers a wondrous ability and their youngest gets into trouble. Leila del Duca’s Afar …

Couri Vine, Issues 1 & 2 by Vanessa Shealy and Leah Lovise

Couri Vine #1: Young People for the Leader This is a fine introductory outing for Couri, combining tropes of children’s literature with good old-fashioned pulpy sci-fi. An outsider ripped from her everyday school & community life by revelations about her family and her world that she alone can resolve, Couri …

Maps to Taps

I was selected by my supervisor to attend the annual ESRI User Conference in San Diego this past June. Much geospatial fun was had, as was a surprising amount of fun with the marketing crew. Story Maps were on everyone’s lips, and I set out to collect material to make …

Review: Deep Dark Fears, by Fran Krause

This title was provided to me at no cost for review purposes by the publisher. Fears seem to share some properties with dreams, as both spring from similar irrational, twilight corners of the mind. While it’s practically axiomatic that among the most boring things one can discuss is the weird …

Review: Seconds, by Bryan Lee O’Malley

After a phenomenon like Scott Pilgrim, anything Bryan Lee O’Malley did next would naturally invite comparison. Seconds certainly has some things in common with Pilgrim, particularly by way of personalities, and even in terms of conventions which replace conventional exposition with a pithy caption. Our protagonist, Katie, is seemingly the …

Review: The Sculptor, by Scott McCloud

David Smith is a sculptor at the end of his rope, having blown his moment in the spotlight of the New York art scene and possessed of little save his idiosyncratic set of promises to himself. While spending his last few dollars in a diner, he is joined by his …

Review: The Good Inn, by Black Francis and Josh Frank

My familiarity with the Pixies’ music is shallow at best, and nonexistent when it comes to Black Francis’ solo work, so I can’t speak to The Good Inn as a work reflective of any lyrical tendencies. In fact, when the characters break into song (as they do occasionally), the tunes I found myself …